How can I contribute more to society?

Thanks for the A2A. This is a huge question and could take you in many different directions depending on how you begin to answer it. So I’ll focus mainly on that beginning. In order to ferret out how you - with your unique values, resources, perspective and abilities - can best contribute to society, you will first need to:

Clearly define your personal, interpersonal and social values. I saw that you began to do this in your response to one of the answers here, but IMO you could really drill down deep to understand and document what you think is most important in your relationships, your personal standards of ethics, and in what you believe to be societal standards and mechanisms for good.
Clearly understand what you bring to the table. What are you strengths, aptitudes, skills and resources? What is your work style, relationship style and communication style? What are you really good at, and what do you enjoy doing the most?

Begin to explore how your values intersect with your individual strengths, aptitudes, skills and resources. This can be the trickiest part of the process, and it is important to avoid locking yourself into a single trajectory too quickly - instead, you can remain open, and look at what is already being done in the world that resonates with both what you care about, and what you are good at.
Identify communities, collaborators and institutions that support your values and strengths. Make an extensive list of these, research them online, and talk with as many people as possible about the options that already exist (there are likely many!). There are probably whole communities whose philosophy of values and approaches to societal contribution align closely with yours.

Try things on for size. Try out a number of different possibilities that you think will allow your values and strengths to be put to good use. Take some classes in a promising field, do some volunteering at a promising organization or work in an entry level position, engage in some activism with a like-minded group of folks, etc.

Be willing to start something on your own if you need to. For me, it became clear after a few decades of “trying things on for size” that there wasn’t a prefect match for me already out in the world in terms of a career, volunteer organization, community, etc. So I started my own business, wrote exclusively about what I was passionate about, and began more informally connecting with folks who had similar values and concerns.

This can be a lengthy process - it took me nearly twenty years to figure all of this out. So be patient, and persistent. Also, to begin with step #1, check out the Self-Assessment Resources on my Integral Lifework website.

I hope this was helpful.

What are the goals and effects of self inquiry meditation on who am I?

Answering the question: "What are the goals and effects of self inquiry meditation on who am I?"

Thanks for the A2A Pete. I had to laugh when I saw this…it’s a big question with a simple experiential answer: try it and you’ll see. So as to be less trite, however, I’ll offer a few nuggets to mull over:

- After seven years of self inquiry Jorge realized there was nothing there. Nothing at all. Self was annihilated and only emptiness filled the place it had once occupied.\

- After fifteen years of self inquiry Martha became God; that is, she recognized a complete absence of differentiation between her Self and the Divine. It was a very humbling experience.

- After a lifetime of self inquiry Wu Wei encountered a unitive substrate of being that consumed all independent and personal aspects of identity, so that all that remained was the Tao.

- After twenty-seven lifetimes of self-inquiry, Advika became extremely bored with the practice and began living her life very simply and without artifice, with an endless well of compassion for everyone around her, and with plenty of time to watch children at play.

As for negative effects: self-obsession, attachment to spiritual progress, and a breakdown of survival functions can occur if more constructive intentions are not cultivated from the beginning. Because of this, whenever any form of meditation is taught, I believe students should be encouraged to set this intention in their hearts and minds, and to try to feel it deeply in their bones, before each session: “May this be for the good of All.”

My 2 cents.

On Somatic Psychology

In Response to Quora Question: "What is your experience with somatic psychology? Was it useful?"

Body-centered psychotherapy has been immensely useful in my experience, as have many other body-centered therapeutic techniques. This is from the perspective of someone who has both experienced personal psychological, emotional and physical healing through these therapies, and helped others discover healing through them. In particular, the practice of Hakomi has been very effective, mainly because it so actively integrates the body's felt experience (and provocation of/interaction with somatic memory, repressed material and volatile emotions) with talk therapy and client-centered collaboration. Modalities that focus solely on releasing "stuck stuff" through bodywork can also be powerful aids in this self-awareness and healing process (for example, craniosacral therapy, myofascial release, etc.), but it is the inclusion of conscious introspection, metacognition, and compassionate modification of counterproductive thoughts and emotions that further promotes individuation and "moving beyond" merely coping with internalized trauma, confusion or persistent unhappiness. In any case, I hope that this field will continue to expand to include more and more dimensions of self, and not restrict itself to, for example, mind-body-energy relationships. In my own work, in-depth exploration and development of the spiritual dimension has been a critical component, as have a sense of purpose, relationship to community, sexuality and so forth. The various manifestations of somatic psychology are certainly an important piece of the overall puzzle of our human experience, but only a piece. Such inherently "interdisciplinary" approaches will, I hope, become more inclusive as we come to better appreciate the totality of our being. My 2 cents.